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Worker’s reason for excluding “entitled” woman from free lift slammed

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A worker was criticized online after sharing that they had refused to give their female coworker a lift to the train station after a late shift, even though they’d gladly offered all their other colleagues a ride.

The person took to Reddit’s popular Am I The A****** (AITA) channel to explain that they found the woman they’d ditched to be “entitled” and “lazy” and that as a result, they’d forbidden her from getting rides home in their truck like other members of their team.

“I have a weekend job at a warehouse where most people can’t afford cars. They mainly rely on public transit which isn’t reliable when most of us end our shift,” the Redditor wrote. “Most of them used to walk 5 miles to the train station or stay at work for few more hours unpaid. The train station is literally on the way to my second job and my house, so I offer them free rides. I drive an F-150, so the truck seats 5 people including myself.”

“We usually clock out at 2 in the morning, so I drive everyone in my shift to the train station. I don’t mind, my truck can fit them all and it’s fun to drive with others. However, there’s this one woman who I don’t care for that much, and she has a reputation for being lazy,” they added.

Employee
A stock image of a woman being excluded by her colleagues in an office. A Redditor was slammed for refusing to drive their female co-worker to the train station despite doing so for other colleagues.
Getty Images

The Redditor went on to complain that while other employees are working the woman is allegedly relaxing outside or speaking informally with their supervisor.

“She also never thanked me or even says please, it’s like she feels she’s entitled to a free ride,” the Redditor wrote.

“[Recently] all of us clocked out at 2AM and I said out loud the names of the people [that I’ll be dropping off]. As we’re walking outside, the woman comes up to me and says ‘can you drop me off? I’ll be ready in few minutes,’ and I said ‘sorry but from now on I don’t want to give you rides anymore. You should ask for a shift change.'”

The Redditor said that the woman became visually upset after the heated conversation and that she informed them that it was not safe for her to be walking out in the streets alone in the early hours of the morning.

“I changed my tone and said ‘enough, it’s my truck. You can find your own way home, I’m not the city bus.’ It caused a bit of a scene but my coworkers agreed with me,” they wrote.

Expert Verdict: Try to Understand the Other Person

Jarir Mallah, Ling App’s HR specialist, offered his advice to Newsweek on how individuals can navigate toxic working environments and challenge toxic coworkers.

“The first is to understand the other person’s perspective and acknowledge that you may have different communication styles or work methods,” Mallah said.

“Then you should seek advice from your [human resources] department and strategies to learn how to circumvent clashes. Another thing you can do is to maintain focus on the task at hand. Setting goals and leaving personal issues on the sidelines is a must to get the job done.”

“Finally, it’s important to practice empathy. It’s difficult to know a person’s background or personal issues that may be transferring into the workplace, so remember to be patient and kind,” he added.

What Do the Comments Say?

Since it was shared on the social media platform on July 24 by @Healthy_Cockroach_18, the Reddit post has been upvoted by 91 percent of the users who engaged with it and commented on over than 1,700 times. The vast majority of the users interacting with the post have criticized the worker for excluding their female coworker.

“Of course it’s your truck and you can choose who rides it, but the way you did that is completely a****** material,” one user wrote. “Instead of talking to her and saying you wouldn’t give her a ride anymore, you embarrassed her in front of everyone.”

Another user commented: “Not only did he embarrass her, he also took away the people she used to walk with. Now it’s one woman walking alone though a dangerous area at 2AM. There’s safety in numbers and, although Reddit sometimes likes to pretend otherwise, women are more vulnerable than men in this type of scenario.”

Newsweek‘s “What Should I Do?” offers expert advice to readers. If you have a personal dilemma, let us know via life@newsweek.com. We can ask experts for advice on relationships, family, friends, money and work and your story could be featured on WSID at Newsweek.

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